Knowledgebase : eMail
Set up your Advanced mailbox in minutes with a variety of email programs by following this guide.

You can configure your IPhone to connect to your mailbox using POP/IMAP.

 

Full details how to set up email on your IPhone can be found on the Apple website at: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1385.

 

Step 1
If this is the first email account you have set up, tap Mail. If you have already created a mail account on this device select Settings>Mail>Accounts>Add Account.

Step 2

The new account wizard will open. Choose Other mail type.

Step 3
Select POP/SMTP as the server type, then enter the following details:

Email address:Enter your full email address

Server type: POP/SMTP

Internet host name for incoming mail server: mail.yourdomain.xxx

Internet hostname for outgoing mail server: mail.yourdomain.xxx

Username:Your full email address

Password:The mailbox password you specified when creating the mailbox

  1. Open your Windows DNS Manager.  (Start Menu -> Administrative Tools -> DNS)
  2. Expand the nodes on your DNS Server and select the target domain where you will be adding the two DKIM TXT records:

 

 

Right-Click the target domain and select "Other New Records...":


 

 

Scroll towards the bottom of the list and select "Text (TXT)" then press the "Create Record..." button:


 

In the new "Text (TXT)" resource record, enter the following:

  1. Record name: _domainkey
  2. Text: (This should be the value of your DKIM Policy Record).
    Example: o=~; r=postmaster@yourdomain.com

 

 

Press "OK" when you are done and you should see an entry similar to: 


 

DKIM Public Key Record Instructions

  1. Open your Windows DNS Manager.  (Start Menu -> Administrative Tools -> DNS) 
  2. Expand the nodes on your DNS Server and select the target domain where you will be adding the two DKIM TXT records:

 

 

Right-Click the target domain and select "Other New Records...":


 

Scroll towards the bottom of the list and select "Text (TXT)" then press the "Create Record..." button:


 

In the new "Text (TXT)" resource record, enter the following:

  1. Record name: (DKIM Selector)._domainkey 
    Example: ue201008._domainkey
     
  2. Text: (This should be the value of your DKIM Public Key Record).
    Example: v=DKIM1; p=MIGfMA0GCSqGSIb4DQ(.....)z2nJSPOxvGGznkcY25w5lIYpxpVwZ/IwIDAQAB;

 

 

Press "OK" when you are done and you should see an entry similar to: 


Overview
DomainKeys Identified Mail (DKIM) lets an organization take responsibility for a message while it is in transit. The organization is a handler of the message, either as its originator or as an intermediary. Their reputation is the basis for evaluating whether to trust the message for delivery. Technically DKIM provides a method for validating a domain name identity that is associated with a message through cryptographic authentication.


What is the purpose of DKIM?
DKIM allows an organization to take responsibility for transmitting a message, in a way that can be verified by a recipient. The organization can be the author's, the originating sending site, an intermediary, or one of their agents. Their reputation is the basis for evaluating whether to trust the message for delivery. 

 
What does DKIM Do?
The responsible organization adds a digital signature to the message, associating it with a domain name of that organization.  Typically, signing will be done by an service agent within the authority of the message originator's Administrative Management Domain (ADMD). Signing might be performed by any of the functional components, in that environment, including: Mail User Agent (MUA), or Mail Submission Agent (MSA), Internet Boundary MTA. DKIM permits signing to be performed by authorized third-parties.


Who validates the signature?
After a message has been signed, any agent in the message transit path can choose to validate the signature. Typically, validation will be done by an agent in the ADMD of the message recipient. Again, this may be done by any functional component within that environment. Notably this means that the signature can be used by the recipient ADMD's filtering software, rather than requiring the recipient end-user to make an assessment. 



What does the DKIM signature mean?
The owner of the domain name being used for a DKIM signature is declaring that they are accountable for the message. This means that their reputation is at stake.

Receivers who successfully validate a signature can use information about the signer as part of a program to limit spam, spoofing, phishing, or other undesirable behavior, although the DKIM specification itself does not prescribe any specific actions by the recipient.

 

Will using DKIM imporve deliverability?
Whether this improves deliverability or bypasses filters is entirely at the discretion of the validating receivers. When a message has been signed using DKIM, a receiver uses their knowledge about the signer to determine the most appropriate treatment of the message. It is expected that messages from a signer who has a good reputation will be subject to less scrutiny by the receiver's filters. 


 Implementation Details: 
Upon request, DNN4Less will generate and implement DKIM Signatures for Domains owned by the customer.
Signatures will have the following attributes:

  • Signing Algorithm: RSA-SHA256
  • Key Size: 1024
  • Selector: UE(YEAR)(MONTH)

Once the DKIM Signature has been generated, the customer will receive a text file containing the Public Key Record.

It is the customer's responsibilty to have their Domains DNS updated with (2) TXT entries: Policy Record & Public Key Record

 

Example DKIM TXT Entries:

 

  1. _domainkey.(YourDomain). IN TXT "o=~; r=postmaster@(YourDomain)"
  2. (Selector)._domainkey.(YourDomain). IN TXT "v=DKIM1; p=MIGfMA0GCSqGSIb4DQ(.....)z2nJSPOxvGGznkcY25w5lIYpxpVwZ/IwIDAQAB;"


DKIM Policy Record:

A domain name using DomainKeys should have a single policy record configured. 
This is a DNS TXT-record with the name "_domainkey" prefixed to the domain name - for example "_domainkey.yourdomain.com". 
The data of this TXT-record contains the policy which is basically either "o=-" or "o=~".

 

  • o=- 
    Means "all e-mails from this domain are signed"
  • o=~ 
    Means "some e-mails from this domain are signed". 
  • t=
    Means "Test" 
  • r=postmaster@(YourDomain.com)
    Responsible e-mail address 
  • n=
    Allows you specify a note.



DKIM Public Key Record (Domain Signature Record):

DKIM uses a simple "tag=value" syntax in several contexts, including in messages and domain signature records.

 

Values are a series of strings containing either plain text, base64 text (as defined in [RFC2045], Section 6.8), qp-section (ibid, Section 6.7), or dkim-quoted-printable (as defined in Section 2.6). The name of the tag will determine the encoding of each value. Unencoded semicolon (";") characters MUST NOT occur in the tag value, since that separates tag-specs.

 

  • v=
    Version of the DKIM key record (plain-text; RECOMMENDED, default is "DKIM1"). If specified, this tag MUST be set to "DKIM1" (without the quotes). This tag MUST be the first tag in the record. Records beginning with a "v=" tag with any other value MUST be discarded. Note that verifiers must do a string comparison on this value; for example, "DKIM1" is not the same as "DKIM1.0".Version (MUST be included). This tag defines the version of this specification that applies to the signature record. 
  • g=
    Granularity of the key (plain-text; OPTIONAL, default is "*"). This value MUST match the Local-part of the "i=" tag of the DKIM-Signature header field (or its default value of the empty string if "i=" is not specified), with a single, optional "*" character matching a sequence of zero or more arbitrary characters ("wildcarding"). An email with a signing address that does not match the value of this tag constitutes a failed verification. The intent of this tag is to constrain which signing address can legitimately use this selector, for example, when delegating a key to a third party that should only be used for special purposes. Wildcarding allows matching for addresses such as "user+*" or "*-offer". An empty "g=" value never matches any addresses.
  • h=
    Acceptable hash algorithms (plain-text; OPTIONAL, defaults to allowing all algorithms). A colon-separated list of hash algorithms that might be used. Signers and Verifiers MUST support the "sha256" hash algorithm. Verifiers MUST also support the "sha1" hash algorithm.
  • k=
    Key type (plain-text; OPTIONAL, default is "rsa"). Signers and verifiers MUST support the "rsa" key type. The "rsa" key type indicates that an ASN.1 DER-encoded [ITU.X660.1997] RSAPublicKey[RFC3447] (see Sections 3.1 and A.1.1) is being used in the "p=" tag. (Note: the "p=" tag further encodes the value using the base64 algorithm.)
  • n=
    Notes that might be of interest to a human (qp-section; OPTIONAL, default is empty). No interpretation is made by any program. This tag should be used sparingly in any key server mechanism that has space limitations (notably DNS). This is intended for use by administrators, not end users.
  • p=
    Public-key data (base64; REQUIRED). An empty value means that this public key has been revoked. The syntax and semantics of this tag value before being encoded in base64 are defined by the "k=" tag.
  • s=
    Service Type (plain-text; OPTIONAL; default is "*"). A colon-separated list of service types to which this record applies. Verifiers for a given service type MUST ignore this record if the appropriate type is not listed.
  • t=
    Flags, represented as a colon-separated list of names (plain-text; OPTIONAL, default is no flags set). The defined flags are as follows:

    • This domain is testing DKIM. Verifiers MUST NOT treat messages from signers in testing mode differently from unsigned email, even should the signature fail to verify. Verifiers MAY wish to track testing mode results to assist the signer.
    • s
      Any DKIM-Signature header fields using the "i=" tag MUST have the same domain value on the right-hand side of the "@" in the "i=" tag and the value of the "d=" tag. That is, the "i=" domain MUST NOT be a subdomain of "d=". Use of this flag is RECOMMENDED unless subdomaining is required.

SMTP Relay Account
The following instructions are provided for customers who have an SMTP Relay Account. If you do not have an account and would like more information, please contact our Sales Department.


Error Message
451 Requested action aborted: This mail account has sent too many messages in a short amount of time. Please try later.


Description
If you receive this error when attempting to send an eMail campaign, it means that you are sending messages faster than your SMTP Relay Service plan allows.

SMTP Relay Service plans have three items that define their limits:

  1. How many recipients you are allowed to send messages to per month. 
  2. How many recipients you are allowed to send messages to per hour.
  3. How many sending domains you are allowed to use.


Resolution
To resolve this issue, you have two options:

  1. Throttle your eMail software so that it sends messages slower. 
  2. Upgrade your account to a service plan that meets your required sending levels. 

 

When attempting to send an email, your email client may report one of the following error messages:

  • 550 No such user here
  • 503 This mail server requires authentication when attempting to send to a non-local e-mail address. Please check your mail client settings or contact your administrator to verify that the domain or address is defined for this server.
  • 503 This mail server requires authentication. Please check your mail client settings.

Although receiving mail works correctly.

This error message is reported by the e-mail server to your email client such as Outlook because the check box labeled "My Server Requires Authentication" is not checked.  Your email client attempts to send the email to the server without providing a password, hence the server replies that you are not allowed to relay without proper authentication.

Resolution:To resolve this issue check the check box next to "My Server Requires Authentication".

> Open Outlook 2003/2007
> Click Tools
> E-Mail Accounts > View or change existing e-mail accounts
> Select the email account
> Click Change
> Click 'More Settings'
> Click the 'Outgoing Server' Tab
> Check the checkbox "My outgoing server (SMTP) requires authentication"
> Click OK
> Next
> Finish

Overview

Sender Policy Framework (SPF) is a method of fighting spam. As more time passes, this protocol will be used as one of the standard methods of fighting spam on the Internet. An SPF record is a TXT record that is part of a domain's DNS zone file. The TXT record specifies a list of authorized host names/IP addresses that mail can originate from for a given domain name. Once this entry is placed within the DNS zone, no further configuration is necessary to take advantage of servers that incorporate SPF checking into their anti-spam systems. This SPF record is added the same way as a regular A, MX, or CNAME record.

The authoritative source for this information can be found here: http://www.openspf.net/SPF_Record_Syntax.

Requirements

Your domain must be using DNN4Less name servers:

  • NS1.DNN4Less.com
  • NS2.DNN4Less.com

Instructions

  1. Log into Control Panel.
  2. Select your domain name
  3. Edit DNS Settings
  4. Click + Add a record to create a new record. Set the type to TXT and enter your SPF record in the right column.
  5. Click OK to Save the changes.

 

Sometimes, if an email is too large, or has become corrupt your mail client will be unable to download it from the mailbox. As your mail client will attempt to download emails in the order they arrived in the mailbox, if you have problems with one email you will not be able to download any emails received after this time.

You can remove an unwanted email through a web based mail retrievals system such as Web mail. From here you will be able to delete the problematic email.

Webmail allows you access to send/receive emails through any web browser, and provides all the tools you need to administer and maintain your mailbox. Using webmail you can do the following:

  • View your emails

  • Reply to and create new emails

  • Move emails between folders

  • Update your address book

  • Set up auto-responders

You can securely access your webmail by visiting http://webmail.yourdomain.xxx (Replacing yourdomain.xxx with your actual domain name).

 

You can also use webmail followed by your domain name. For example if your domain is yourdomain.com then enter http://webmail.yourdomain.xxx.

You can back up the emails downloaded onto your computer within the settings of your mail software. The exact steps needed to back up your emails will differ slightly depending on what software you are using. This article will explain the process of backing up for Outlook 2003 and 2007. At the end of this article are links to external sites explaining the process for other email clients.

 

Backing up your Data

Step 1
Open Outlook. Click File and then Import and Export from the drop down menu.

Step 2

Select Export to a file and click Next.

 
 

Step 3
Select Personal Folder File and click Next.

 
 

Step 4
Select the folders that you would like to back up. In this example we are backing up the inbox and all the subfolders within the inbox.

 
 

Step 5
Click Next.

 

Step 6
Press Browse and choose where on your local computer you would like to store your backed up data. Make a note of where you saved the file, so you can easily find it later. Click Finish to complete the process.

 
Step 7
If you would like to secure your back up data, enter a password and click OK.
 
Step 8
Press Browse and choose where on your local computer you would like to store your backed up data. Make a note of where you saved the file, so you can easily find it later. Click Finish to complete the process.
 

Restoring your Data

 

Step 1
Click File then Import and Export from the drop down menu.

Step 2
Select Import from another program or file then click Next.

Step 3
Select Personal Folder File and click Next.

Step 4
Click Browse and navigate to your backed up file. Click Next.

Step 5
If you created a password to use for your backup file enter it in the text box provided and click OK.

Step 6
Select the folders you would like to restore and click Finish.

External links for other email software

 

 

You can also check the help documentation supplied with your email software, which should be available from the Help menu.

Using DNN4Less Mail Server.

  • Navigate to Host > Host Settings.
  • At Advanced Settings, click the Maximize  button.
  • At SMTP Server Settings, click the Maximize  button.
  • In the SMTP Server field, enter the SMTP address of the server. E.g. mail.yourdomain.com (replace yourdomain.com with your actual domain name)
  • At SMTP Authentication, select from the following options:
    • Anonymous  (This is the default option)
    • Basic (You should choose "Basic")
    • NTLM (Do not choose)
  • In the SMTP Username field, enter a SMTP Username. (admin@yourdomain.com (replace yourdomain.com with your actual domain name))
  • In the SMTP Password field, enter a SMTP Password. (your email password)
  • Click Update.

NOTE: Make sure that email address in Host \Basic Settings\Host Details is the same email address as you entered in SMTP server email address.

 

Using DNN4Less Mail relay service.

  • Navigate to Host > Host Settings.
  • At Advanced Settings, click the Maximize button.
  • At SMTP Server Settings, click the Maximize button.
  • In the SMTP Server field, enter the SMTP address of the server and the port number. E.g. relay.DNN4Less.com
  • SMTP Authentication, select from the following options:
  • Anonymous (This is the default option)
  • Basic (You should choose "Basic")
  • NTLM (Do not choose)
  • In the SMTP Username field, enter a SMTP Username. (xxxxxx@DNN4Less)
  • In the SMTP Password field, enter a SMTP Password. (your email password)
  • Click Update.

Using Google Apps.

  • Navigate to Host > Host Settings.
  • At Advanced Settings, click the Maximize button.
  • At SMTP Server Settings, click the Maximize button.
  • In the SMTP Server field, enter the SMTP address of the server and the port number. E.g. smtp.gmail.com:465
  • At SMTP Authentication, select from the following options:
  • Anonymous (This is the default option)
  • Basic (You should choose "Basic")
  • NTLM (Do not choose)
  • In the SMTP Username field, enter a SMTP Username. (admin@yourdomain.com (replace yourdomain.com with your actual domain name))
  • In the SMTP Password field, enter a SMTP Password. (your email password)
  • Check the SSL box.
  • Click Update.



If you report an email problem to DNN4Less Technical Support they may ask you to send them a copy of the offending email's headers. These contain a log of the email's passage across the Internet from the sender to the recipient.

This article tells you how to access the headers, and make a copy suitable for sending to DNN4Less.

The header text looks like this:

Received: from mail.DNN4Less.COM (www.DNN4Less.COM [213.171.192.201]) by exchange.DNN4Less.COM with SMTP (Microsoft Exchange Internet Mail Service Version 10.11)
id 409DRQ9A; Thu, 17 Oct 2002 14:48:00 +0100

Received: from SMTP32-FWD by DNN4Less.COM
(SMTP32) id A000000EF; Thu, 17 Oct 2002 14:48:00 +0100

Received: from vrsmailfilter02 [213.171.193.102] by mail.DNN4Less.COM
(SMTPD32-6.00) id AF8FD8A0296; Thu, 17 Oct 2002 14:47:59 +0100

Received: FROM mail-scanner-02.DNN4Less.COM BY vrsmailfilter02 ; Thu Oct 17 14:53:21 2002 +0100

Received: From [193.113.209.26] by mail-scanner-02.
DNN4Less.COM
(Matrix SMTP Mail Server v(1.3)) ID=B598D17A-8E6F-4B4B-8495-CA454F29012C ; Thu, 17 Oct 2002 14:53:14 +0100

Received: from [192.168.1.10] (actually host host213-122-82-211.in-addr.btopenworld.com) by c2bapps5 with SMTP-CUST (XT-PP) with ESMTP; Thu, 17 Oct 2002 14:47:31 +0100

User-Agent: Microsoft-Outlook-Express-Macintosh-Edition/5.02.2022

Date: Thu, 17 Oct 2002 14:03:32 +0000
Subject: Re: Account 41893
MAILER-TRACE: 0
From: Sam Smith <Sam@smith.com>
To:
DNN4Lesss Support <support@DNN4Less.COM>
Message-ID: <B9D473B4.971E%sam@smith.com>
In-Reply-To: <040BC5194880BA4DBAF15C0C9D5A11BA671849@
DNN4Less.COM>
Mime-version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit
X-RCPT-TO: <support@
DNN4Less.COM>

 

Procedure

Using Outlook Express:

Step 1: Open Outlook Express.

Step 2: Right-click on the appropriate email and select the Properties option from the menu that appears.

Step 3: Click on the Details tab. The email's headers are shown in a scroll able box called Internet Headers.

Step 4: Highlight all of the header text in the box, and press Ctrl-C to copy the text onto the clipboard.

You can now paste the header text into the body of an email and send it to DNN4Lesss Technical Support.

 

Using Outlook:

Step 1: Open Outlook.

Step 2: Right-click on the appropriate email and select the Options item from the menu that appears. The email's headers are shown in a scroll able box called Internet Headers.

Step 3: Highlight all of the header text in the box, and press Ctrl-C to copy the text onto the clipboard.

You can now paste the header text into the body of an email and send it to DNN4Less Technical Support.

 

Using Thunderbird:

Step 1: Open Thunderbird

Step 2: Highlight the email you would like to view the header information for.

Step 3: Click View in the menu bar then select message source from the drop down menu.

Step 4: A new window will open with the header information shown in plain text.

You can now paste the header text into the body of an email and send it to DNN4Less Technical Support.

It is possible to use DNN4Less SMTP servers to send email from your web scripts. However to preserve the integrity of our networks, there are some limitations in place to avoid misuse.
 

You are responsible for the misuse of any scripts on your website.

 

Restrictions on Sending Mail from our Servers

To prevent spam from being sent through our webservers, there are certain restrictions in place when sending email from web scripts. These restrictions help us prevent spammers from using our servers and improves the service we can provide to you.

  • Email must be sent to, or from, an email address hosted by DNN4Less. This must be an existing mailbox in your account, and if your domain’s MX record points to another email provider, it will not count as being hosted by DNN4Less.

  • All outbound email must be routed through our outgoing email servers or it will not be delivered. It is not possible to send email from a script directly to a third party SMTP server.

  • We limit the number of emails you can send in any thirty second period and any ten minute period.

Outgoing mail servers

All mail scripts running on our webservers should use smtp-out.promailbox.net as the outgoing mail server. Please consult the documentation for your scripting language or component to find out how to set this correctly.

ASP Components

Your ASP code can use any of the following components:

PHP

Use the PHP mail function and set the ‘mail from’ value using the following code - replacing email@yourdomain.com with the appropriate email address.

$email_from = “email@yourdomain.com”;
ini_set("sendmail_from", “$email_from");

You need to add a fifth “-f” parameter to the sendmail function. This will set the name of the from address.

mail($email_to, $email_subject, $email_message, $headers, ‘-f’.$email_from);

Tips on securing your mail script

Form-to-mail scripts allow your visitors to fill out a form on your website, which will then email their input to you.

Such forms are regularly used by spammers, who hijack your script to send unsolicited email. Through a few simple checks, you can ensure that your form to mail script is only used by your website and sends to the email address you choose.

 

You can secure your form to mail scripts by checking the referrer string of the page calling your script, before processing it.

Setting up your Standard or Advanced mailbox in Outlook 2007 should take just a few minutes.

You can connect to your mailbox using either the POP3 or IMAP protocols. As a rule of thumb it is better to use POP3 if only one computer accesses your mailbox, while it is better to use IMAP if you have a number of computers that will access your mailbox.

 

Before you begin

Before you set your mailbox up you need to know if it is a Standard or an Advanced mailbox, and you need to make a note of your mailbox connection details.

If you are connecting to a Standard mailbox you will need your Internet Service Provider's (ISP) outgoing mail server (SMTP) details. If you are unsure as to what these are you can either contact your ISP to request these details, or upgrade your email address to an Advanced mailbox.

If you are connecting to an Advanced mailbox, or your broadband or dial up connection is supplied by DNN4Less, then you can use our roaming SMTP server settings to send your mail.

Step 1

Open Outlook 2007. Click Tools in the top menu and then click Account Settings.

Step 2

Select the E-mail tab and click New.

 
 

Step 3
Check the box marked Microsoft Exchange, POP3, IMAP or HTTP and click Next.

 
 

Step 4
Select Manually configure server settings of additional server types and click Next.

 
 

Step 5
Select Internet E-mail and click Next.

 
 
Step 6

There is a lot of information to fill in on this next screen, let’s look at each section bit by bit.

User Information

  • Your name: This is what most email users will see in their inboxes instead of your email address. Enter your name

  • E-mail Address: Enter your full email address. This is made up of the mailbox name you chose, an @ symbol and your domain name. you@yourdomain.com for example.

Server Information

  • Account type: Depending on your preferred type of connection, select POP or IMAP from the drop down menu.

  • Incoming mail server: Enter mail.yourdomain.com (replacing yourdomain.com with your domain name)

  • Outgoing mail server (SMTP): Enter the SMTP server your ISP supplied you with in the Outgoing mail (SMTP) server text box.

If you are setting up an Advanced mailbox you should enter mail.yourdomain.com (replacing yourdomain.com with your own domain name) into the Outgoing mail server (SMTP) text box.

 

Login Information

  • User Name: Enter your full email address. This made up of the mailbox name you chose, an @ symbol and your domain name.

  • Password: Enter the password you set up when you created the mailbox within your control panel.

  • Remember password: Check this box.

  • Require logon using Secure Password Authentication (SPA): Leave unchecked.

Once completed, the screen should look similar to the following:

 

Once you have entered all the information required, click More Settings.

 
Step 7

If your ISP’s SMTP server requires username and password authentication, or you are using DNN4Less' roaming SMTP servers to send mail from this mailbox, then click the Outgoing Server tab and make sure My outgoing server (SMTP) requires authentication is selected.

If you are using your ISP's SMTP servers, then select Log on using and enter the username and password they provided you with.

If you are using DNN4Less' roaming SMTP server then make sure Use same settings as my incoming mail server is selected.

 
 

Step 8

If you are using DNN4Less' SMTP server details then click the Advanced tab and change the Outgoing server (SMTP) port number from 25 to 587.

 

Step 9

Click OK, then Next and Finish to close the wizard. Outlook 2007 is now configured to send and receive email through your Standard or Advanced mailbox.

The best way to access webmail is to go to the webmail URL. It is just the domain name with "webmail" appended to the start.
    http://webmail.yourdomain.xxx

You receive the following message when you try to send a message to an email address:

503 Bad sequence of commands. Could not process RCPT command when in this state

Error Description:
The error means that the remote client has sent a command to the server that is not in the correct and recognized order for the SMTP service.

Apostrophes - remove any apostrophes (single quotes) or other non-alphabetic characters from your email account name(s).

VPN - if your system is trying to connect via a VPN network while you're sending email, you may get this error. Try disconnecting the VPN before sending/ receiving mail.

Full mailbox - make sure the mailbox of the affected account is not full or has met/ exceeded its quota. You can uncheck the following option to make sure a copy of all your emails is not being left on the server (note that since the email will be downloaded to your PC after this setting change, you won't be able to access your emails from another location if you do this). In Outlook, browse to Tools > Account Setting > More settings > Advanced > uncheck "leave a copy of this message on the server."

SMTP port - use port 587 (instead of the default 25) for outgoing mail.

Server authentication - setup your outgoing mail to use outgoing server authentication (sends mail by logging in with your email address and password). In Outlook, browse to Tools > Account Settings > More settings > Advanced and change the outgoing server to 'Auto.' Next, browse back to More settings > Outgoing server and check the "My outgoing server uses the same authentication as my incoming server" box. If you select to have Outlook "remember your password" you won't have to type it in every time you send an email.

Sender matching - make sure you're sending from the same email address that the recipient sees your email coming in as (ie. don't make the "from" field differ from the email address used in your outgoing mail settings).

Outlook PST files - sometimes the 503 error will occur if you have a corrupt outlook PST (mail archive) file. Try repairing the file.

  1. Start up Dreamweaver and open up your web page.

  2. Go to the part of your web page where you have typed your email address and select the address. For example, if you have typed not-real-address@example.com on your page, drag your mouse over the entire text not-real-address@example.com to select it.

  3. At the bottom of your Dreamweaver window, in the PROPERTIES panel, look at the "Link" field. If you can't see a link field in the panel, click the "HTML" button on the leftmost portion of the PROPERTIES panel. (Yes, the word "HTML" there is actually a button even though it doesn't look like one.) The "Link" field should be currently blank.

    Type mailto:not-real-address@example.com into that field, replacing not-real-address@example.com with your email address. To make sure that this is clear, let me say this another way. Type your email address into the link field, but prefix your email address with "mailto:" (without the quotes). There should be no spaces between "mailto:" and your email address.

    Once again, note carefully that I said prefix it with "mailto:". There are NO double slashes ("//"). None. It's just the "mailto" word followed by a colon (":"), followed immediately by your email address. And there are no spaces between those characters either.

  4. Hit the ENTER key when you've finished entering your email address. Your email address in your web page will now appear underlined. It will be clickable in your actual web page once you publish it and test it in a browser.

  5. Save your page and publish it.

 

This article will explain how you can create an SPF record on your server using Plesk 11.

 

If you have not already done so you will need to generate an SPF record first this can be done at Microsoft's SPF record wizard

 

 

  1. Login to your Control Panel https://Control.DNN4Less.com/cp
  2. Select your domain
  3. Click on the Open in Control Panel link for the relevant domain name.
  4. Click on the Website & Domains tab.
  5. Click on the DNS settings link.
  6. Click on the Add Record icon.
  7. Select TXT From the drop down list.
  8. Leave the Domain name field blank and enter the generated SPF record in theTXT record field.
  9. Press the OK button to add the record.
  10. To apply the SPF record to the DNS zone press the Update button.

 

Spam is unsolicited email, usually of a commercial nature, which is mass distributed to newsgroups, multiple mailing lists and individuals.1 If you are tired of dealing with unsolicited junk mail clogging your email accounts, follow the steps in this guide to learn how to stop spam email.

Here are some simple things that you can do:

  1. Don't Open Spam: Don't open messages, don't click on any of their links, and don't buy anything from a spam-advertised site. People get tricked every day into opening spam messages, clicking on their links and buying what they're selling.
  2. Don't Respond to Spam: Responding to a spam email in any way just proves to the spammer that yours is a working email address and that you actively check your emails. Many spammers are actually just looking for email addresses that work. Don't click on any link that says "Unsubscribe" or "Click Here if you Don't Want to Receive Any More Emails". These are just ways for spammers to confirm that you have read the email.
  3. Delete and Mark Spam: It is always a good idea to delete spam emails as soon as you get them. But before you delete them, make sure you mark them as Spam in your email client. Most email clients will allow you to mark certain emails as Spam. This helps the email client identify similar emails in the future and prevent them from finding their way into your inbox.5

What is a feedback loop?
A feedback loop (FBL), sometimes called a complaint feedback loop, is an inter-organizational form of feedback by which an internet service provider (ISP) forwards the complaints originating from their users to the sender's organizations.



DNN4Less subscribes to and activily monitors all the major feedback loops (partial list):


 

DNN4Less has also registered our  address with the Network Abuse Clearing House (abuse.net)

For more information regarding our position on Feedback Loops, please review our Anti-Spam Policy.

Step by step instructions on setting up your Exchange mailbox with a variety of different email programs.
If you're using Outlook as a default email client to send and received emails and you get this message "The server responded: 452", chances are your Webmail is full. To resolve this issue;

  1. You need to log in to your Webmail account and delete items to free up usage space (make sure you also delete items in the Deleted Items" folder too)
  2. Alternatively you can set your Outlook to remove messages from your Webmail (by default it is set to do so) but if it's not you can go to Tools->Options->Mail Setup->Email Accounts-> click on the active email then click "change" ->More Settings-> Advanced tab->Delivery field UNCHECK "Leave a copy of message on the server"

We recommend the following settings for SmarterMail 4.x and higher.  

  1. Login as the System Admin
  2. Go to Security
  3. Go to Anti-Spam Administration and click the Spam Checks tab 

 We also recommend that when assigning weights to the various SPAM Checks that you use increments of 10.

Declude (Leave unchecked if you not have Declude)
Low Probability of Spam weight = 10
Medium Probability of Spam weight = 20
High Probability of Spam weight = 30

SPAMAssassin
This is a single Thread Windows client that can handle approximately 20,000 emails per day.  If your server processes more than this you may want to use SPAMAssassin in a stand-alone Linux configuration.

Bayesian Filter

Weight = 10 (SPAM weight assigned to an email if it fails Bayesian filter test)
Max. Memory to allocate for filtering = 10MB
Message required for filter update  = 500

SPF       
Pass     weight = 0     Senders IP is valid for senders domain
Fail     weight = 30     Senders IP is not valid for senders domain
Soft Fail     weight = 10     Senders IP is questionable for senders domain
Neutral     weight = 0     No strong statement can be made for or against senders IP
PermError     weight = 0     The SPF record could not be processed.
None     weight = 0     SPF is not commonly adopted therefore, we suggest setting this to 0

Reverse DNS
weight = 10

RBL: SpamCop
weight = 10

RBL: SpamHaus SBL
weight = 10

RBL: SpamHaus XBL
weight = 10

Additional RBL’s can be added and weights applied.

To enable a SPAM Check, click the check box associated with the various SPAM filtering option you want applied to your incoming emails.

You can also enable “Blocking” of emails that fail individual SPAM checks.  As an example, enable Blocking for Reverse DNS, if an incoming email message fails only the Reverse DNS test then, the message is assigned a weight of 10, if the SMTP Blocking Weight Threshold is set to 10 then the message is Blocked.

In order to adjust the weights of the various SPAM checks, click on the Edit link on the right of each SPAM Test item.  You can edit the values and then click Save to implement the changes or clicking Cancel to close the Edit dialog without saving changes.

On the Filtering tab the default settings are shown below:

Low Probability of Spam weight = 10
Default Action:     Prefix subject with text
Text to Add:     SPAM-LOW

Medium Probability of Spam weight = 20
Default Action:     Move to Junk E-Mail folder
Text to Add:     SPAM-Medium

High Probability of Spam weight = 30
Default Action:     Move to Junk E-Mail folder
Text to Add:     SPAM-High

Once, you are comfortable with your SPAM settings you may want to change the default action on the High Probability from “Prefix subject with text” to “Delete the Message”.

Enable Greylisting
This feature bounces unrecognized incoming emails that are not included in either the Trusted Sender list or the White Lists. 

If the incoming message is received by an unknown sender the server will bounced the initial message, when a valid email server retries sending the message after the Block period (default 12 minutes) and within the Pass period (default = 240 minutes) then the email is accepted.  This creates a Record expiration for that email which is by default = 36 days.  If another email is received from this same sender then this resets the Record expiration to 36 days.    

If the messages is received by someone in the Trusted Sender list or the White Lists then the message bypasses Greylisting feature and is then processed by only Anti-Virus Administration settings and then delivered.

Block Incoming and Outgoing SMTP connections 
The idea behind SMTP Blocking of Incoming and Outgoing email is to filter out Spam messages before they are delivered to the Spool.

To enable Incoming and Outgoing SMTP Blocking, log in as the System Administrator, go to Security, Anti-Spam Administration, and Spam Check page.

Enabling Incoming SMTP Blocking can apply Spam filter checks such as SPF, Reverse DNS and RealTime Blacklist.

To configure Blocking of Incoming SMTP connections, select the Spam checks you want applied to Incoming email from the Spam Check page. Once, your selections are made, click the SMTP Blocking tab.  The Spam filtering checks that were selected on the Spam Checks page will be displayed under the Current Incoming Weights.  In order to actually enable the Blocking feature, click the Spam Blocking Enabled Check Box.  Next, you can edit the Weight Threshold under Incoming Options, so that when an email arrives and it exceeds the Weight Threshold value the email is blocked and never delivered to the Spool.

For the SMTP Blocking of Outgoing email, Spam filter checks are applied to outgoing email prior to being put in the Spool.  There are additional Spam checks that can be selected such as: Declude, SpamAssassin, Custom Headers, and the Bayesian Filters in addition to those available for blocking of Incoming SMTP connections.

To configure the blocking of Outgoing SMTP connections, select the Spam checks you want applied to outgoing email from the Spam Checks page. Once, your selections are made, click the SMTP Blocking tab.  The Spam filtering checks that were selected on the Spam Checks page will then be displayed under the Current Outgoing Weights.  In order to actually enable the Blocking feature, click the Spam Blocking Enabled Check Box.  Next, you can edit the Weight Threshold under the Outgoing Options, such that when an outgoing email exceeds the Weight Threshold value the email is blocked and never delivered to the Spool.

Then finally, click the Save.

This article was orginally published at http://tinyurl.com/7j59969

Overview
The Sender Policy Framework (SPF) is an open standard specifying a technical method to prevent sender address forgery. More precisely, the current version of SPF — called SPFv1 or SPF Classic — protects the envelope sender address, which is used for the delivery of messages.

Like paper mail letters, e-mail messages have at least two kinds of sender addresses: one on the envelope and one in the letterhead:

 

  • The envelope sender address (sometimes also called the return-path) is used during the transport of the message from mail server to mail server, e.g. to return the message to the sender in the case of a delivery failure. It is usually not displayed to the user by mail programs.
  • The header sender address of an e-mail message is contained in the "From" or "Sender" header and is what is displayed to the user by mail programs. Generally, mail servers do not care about the header sender address when delivering a message.

(There are other solutions that protect the header sender address or that do not care at all about who sent the message, only who originally wrote it.)



Even more precisely, SPFv1 allows the owner of a domain to specify their mail sending policy, e.g. which mail servers they use to send mail from their domain. The technology requires two sides to play together: (1) the domain owner publishes this information in an SPF record in the domain's DNS zone, and when someone else's mail server receives a message claiming to come from that domain, then (2) the receiving server can check whether the message complies with the domain's stated policy. If, e.g., the message comes from an unknown server, it can be considered a fake.


For more information, please visit the official SPF website: http://www.openspf.org/


Updating your SPF record for use with our "Standard SMTP Relay Service" plans:

If your company has defined an SPF record and you are using our Standard SMTP Relay Service, you should update your SPF record to include our servers: 

Example:

YourDomain.com. IN TXT "v=spf1 include:DNN4Less.net ?all"

For more information, please review the SPF Record Syntax: http://www.openspf.org/SPF_Record_Syntax#include

SPF Wizard

For additional assistance in setting up an SPF record, visit http://www.openspf.org/SPF_Record_Syntax

Overview
Simple Message Transfer Protocol (SMTP) is an asymmetric response protocol. This means that it transmits a command, and then waits for a response before transmitting the next command. The commands that SMTP uses are words, but the responses are numeric codes. Following are some common SMTP commands.
  HELO Sent by a client to identify itself, usually with a domain name.
  EHLO Enables the server to identify its support for Extended Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (ESMTP) commands.
  MAIL FROM Identifies the sender of the message; used in the form MAIL FROM:.
  RCPT TO Identifies the message recipients; used in the form RCPT TO:.
  TURN Allows the client and server to switch roles and send mail in the reverse direction without having to establish a new connection.
  ATRN The ATRN (Authenticated TURN) command optionally takes one or more domains as a parameter. The ATRN command must be rejected if the session has not been authenticated.
  ETRN An extension of SMTP. ETRN is sent by an SMTP server to request that another server send any e-mail messages that it has.
  SIZE Provides a mechanism by which the SMTP server can indicate the maximum size message supported. Compliant servers must provide size extensions to indicate the maximum size message that can be accepted. Clients should not send messages that are larger than the size indicated by the server.
  ETRN An extension of SMTP. ETRN is sent by an SMTP server to request that another server send any e-mail messages that it has.
  PIPELINING Provides the ability to send a stream of commands without waiting for a response after each command.
  CHUNKING An ESMTP command that replaces the DATA command. So that the SMTP host does not have to continuously scan for the end of the data, this command sends a BDAT command with an argument that contains the total number of bytes in a message. The receiving server counts the bytes in the message and, when the message size equals the value sent by the BDAT command, the server assumes it has received all of the message data.
  DATA Sent by a client to initiate the transfer of message content.
  DSN An ESMTP command that enables delivery status notifications.
  RSET Nullifies the entire message transaction and resets the buffer.
  VRFY Verifies that a mailbox is available for message delivery; for example, vrfy ted verifies that a mailbox for Ted resides on the local server. This command is off by default in Exchange implementations.
  HELP Returns a list of commands that are supported by the SMTP service.
  QUIT Terminates the session.
  AUTH The AUTH command is an ESMTP command (SMTP service extension) that is used to authenticate the client to the server. The AUTH command sends the clients username and password to the e-mail server. AUTH can be combined with some other keywords asPLAINLOGINCRAM-MD5 and DIGEST-MD5 (e.g. AUTH LOGIN) to choose an authentication mechanism. The authentication mechanism chooses how to login and which level of security that should be used.
  NOOP The NOOP command does nothing else than makes the receiver to send an OK reply. The main purpose is to check that the server is still connected and is able to communicate with the client.
  STARTTLS STARTTLS is an extension to plain text communication protocols. It offers a way to upgrade a plain text connection to an encrypted (TLS or SSL) connection instead of using a separate port for encrypted communication.

Overview
An electronic mail message consists of two components, the message header, and the message body, which is the email's content. The message header contains control information, including, minimally, an originator's email address and one or more recipient addresses. Usually additional information is added, such as a subject header field. Following are some common SMTP headers.

 

  From:

The eMail address, and optionally the name of the author(s). In many eMail clients not changeable except through changing account settings.

  To: The eMail address(es), and optionally name(s) of the message's recipient(s). Indicates primary recipients (multiple allowed), for secondary recipients see Cc: and Bcc: below.
  Subject: A brief summary of the topic of the message. Certain abbreviations are commonly used in the subject, including "RE:" and "FW:".
  Date: The local time and date when the message was written. Like the From: field, many email clients fill this in automatically when sending. The recipient's client may then display the time in the format and time zone local to him/her.
  Message-ID: Also an automatically generated field; used to prevent multiple delivery and for reference in In-Reply-To: (see below).
  Bcc: Blind Carbon Copy; addresses added to the SMTP delivery list but not (usually) listed in the message data, remaining invisible to other recipients.
  Cc: Carbon copy; Many eMail clients will mark eMail in your inbox differently depending on whether you are in the To: or Cc: list.
  Content-Type: Information about how the message is to be displayed, usually a MIME type.
  In-Reply-To: Message-ID of the message that this is a reply to. Used to link related messages together.
  Precedence: Commonly with values "bulk", "junk", or "list"; used to indicate that automated "vacation" or "out of office" responses should not be returned for this mail, e.g. to prevent vacation notices from being sent to all other subscribers of a mailinglist.
  Received: Tracking information generated by mail servers that have previously handled a message, in reverse order (last handler first).
  References: Message-ID of the message that this is a reply to, and the message-id of the message the previous was reply a reply to, etc.
  Reply-To: Address that should be used to reply to the message.
  Sender: Address of the actual sender acting on behalf of the author listed in the From: field (secretary, list manager, etc.).
  Return-Path: When the delivery SMTP server makes the "final delivery" of a message, it inserts a return-path line at the beginning of the mail data. Thisuse of return-path is required; mail systems MUST support it. The return-path line preserves the information in the from the MAIL command.
  Error-To: Indicates where error messages should be sent. In the absence of this line, they go to the Sender:, and absent that, the From: address.
  X-* No standard header field will ever begin with the characters "X-", so application developers are free to use them for their own purposes.

Overview
When any mail client or remote server attempts to send email to a mail server, the mail server will send a response to each command. The response indicates whether the command was processed correctly or not. 


This list is a copy of the Theory of Reply Codes as discussed in RFC821 (the Internet Mail Standard). 


 The three digits of the reply each have a special significance. The first digit denotes whether the response is good, bad or incomplete. An unsophisticated sender-SMTP will be able to determine its next action (proceed as planned, redo, retrench, etc.) by simply examining this first digit. A sender-SMTP that wants to know approximately what kind of error occurred (e.g., mail system error, command syntax error) may examine the second digit, reserving the third digit for the finest gradation of information.


Positive Completion Reply (2.x.x):
The command has been accepted, but the requested action is being held in abeyance, pending confirmation of the information in this reply. The sender-SMTP should send another command specifying whether to continue or abort the action. [Note: SMTP does not have any commands that allow this type of reply, and so does not have the continue or abort commands.]

 

  200 (nonstandard success response, see rfc876)
  211 System status, or system help reply
  214 Help message
  220 <domain> Service ready
  221  <domain> Service closing transmission channel
  250 Requested mail action okay, completed  
  251 User not local; will forward to <forward-path>
  283 The Gordano server is configured so that messages aren't being saved. The FROM and TO address are taken from the e-mail message headers



Positive Intermediate (3.x.x):

The command has been accepted, but the requested action is being held in abeyance, pending receipt of further information. The sender-SMTP should send another command specifying this information. This reply is used in command sequence groups. 

  354 Start message input and end with <CRLF>.<CRLF>. This indicates that the server is ready to accept the message itself (after you have told it who it is from and where you want to to go).



Transient Negative Completion Reply(4.x.x):

The command was not accepted and the requested action did not occur. However, the error condition is temporary and the action may be requested again. The sender should return to the beginning of the command sequence (if any). It is difficult to assign a meaning to "transient" when two different sites (receiver- and sender- SMTPs) must agree on the interpretation. Each reply in this category might have a different time value, but the sender-SMTP is encouraged to try again. A rule of thumb to determine if a reply fits into the 4yz or the 5yz category (see below) is that replies are 4yz if they can be repeated without any change in command form or in properties of the sender or receiver. (E.g., the command is repeated identically and the receiver does not put up a new implementation.)

  421 <domain> Service not available, closing transmission channel
  450 Requested action not taken; mailbox unavilable or busy  
  451 Requested action aborted, local error in processing
  452  Requested action not taken, insufficient system storage  



Permanent Negative Completion Reply (5.x.x):

The command was not accepted and the requested action did not occur. The sender-SMTP is discouraged from repeating the exact request (in the same sequence). Even some "permanent" error conditions can be corrected, so the human user may want to direct the sender-SMTP to reinitiate the command sequence by direct action at some point in the future (e.g., after the spelling has been changed, or the user has altered the account status).

  500 Syntax error, command unrecognized. Also command line too long
  501 Syntax error in paramaters or arguements
  502 Command not implemented
  503 Bad sequence of commands
  504 Command parameters not implemented
  521 <domain> does not accept mail (see rfc1846)
  530 Access denied
  550 Action not taken. Mailbox unavailable. Not found, not accessible
  551 User not local, please try
  552 Exceeded storage allocation
  553 Mailbox name not allowed. Mailbox syntax may be incorrect
  554 Transaction failed

Overview
The use of the Transport Layer Security (TLS) protocol over SMTP offers certificate-based authentication and helps provide security-enhanced data transfers by using symmetric encryption keys. In symmetric-key encryption (also known as shared secret), the same key is used to encrypt and to decrypt the message. TLS applies a Hash-based Message Authentication Code (HMAC). HMAC uses a hash algorithm in combination with a shared secret key to help make sure that the data has not been modified during transmission. The shared secret key is appended to the data to be hashed. This helps enhance the security of the hash because both parties must have the same shared secret key to verify that the data is authentic.

 

Implementation
By default, DNN4Less uses opportunistic TLS on all outbound emails. Our servers will always try to connect to the recipients server using the TLS protocol. If the recipients server support TLS, then traffic is encrypted. If not, then the email is sent using regular SMTP without encryption.

DNN4Less also provide inbound TLS support IF the client’s software supports TLS and the client has it enabled.

Email attachments sent through DNN4Less SMTP server are limited to a total of 20MB, for any single email. Any email with attachments in excess of this limit, will be rejected.

Customers needing to send attachments larger than this, are advised to compress large files to within this limit; or to split the attachment into several part and to send each part in a separate email.

 

This limit applies to the total size of all attachments. For example, two files of 10MB each will be within the limit, while an email with files of 10MB and 11MB (totaling 21MB) will be rejected.

Some ISPs block outgoing email that isn't delivered through their own mail servers. This can help prevent spam but it also stops you from using your Advanced mailbox's SMTP server.

A quick and easy solution is to change the port that your email software uses to send outgoing email. We have provided port 225 and 587 for outgoing email, in case your ISP blocks the standard port 25.

 
Outlook 2003 and 2007
 

Step 1
Open Outlook 2003.

Step 2

Click the Tools menu, then click E-mail Accounts.

Step 3

In the E-mail Accounts wizard, select the radio button beside View or change exisitng e-mail accounts, then click the Next button.

Step 4

Highlight your Advanced mailbox account and click the Change button.

Step 5

Click the More Settings button, which will open a new window.

Step 6

Click the Advanced tab, enter 8889 for POP3 Account or 587 for IMAP Account in the Outgoing server (SMTP) text-box, then click OK.

 
 

Step 7
Click Next, then click Finish.

Your email will now be sent, using port 25 or port 587, to your standard DNN4Less mail server. This should solve the problem of your ISP blocking outgoing email to mail servers other than their own.

Outlook Express, Windows Mail and Windows Live Mail

Step 1

Open Outlook Express/Windows Mail

Step 2

Click the Tools menu, then click Accounts.

Step 3

Highlight your Advanced mailbox account and click the Properties button, which will open a new window.

Step 4

Click the Advanced tab, enter 110 for POP3 Account or 143 for IMAP Account in the Outgoing server (SMTP) text-box, then click the OK button.

Step 5

Click the Close button to complete the change.

Your email will now be sent, using port 110 or 143, to your standard DNN4Less mail server. This should solve the problem of your ISP blocking outgoing email to mail servers other than their own.

Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP), is an internet protocol used to look up contact information (email addresses) from LDAP email directories. Many email client applications can be configured to look up contact information, from such directories.

To facilitate this, your email client application will require the address of an LDAP server. When you attempt to look up contact information, your email client will attempt to get this information from the server specified.

The LDAP server setting is not a mandatory setting and will not affect the transmission or receipt of your email. At the same time, you will not be able to use LDAP services without a server specified in the configuration of your email client application.

Examples of LDAP directories are BigFoot and Infospace.

Spam filters will often check against Realtime BlockLists (RBLs) to check if the sending IP address is from a legitimate source. If an IP address has been blocklisted the decision whether to accept your email for delivery is not based on the content of the email or the email address that it comes from or is addressed to. It is based solely on the mail server that is being used by the sender. An IP address may be listed for a number of reasons, however the most common are that you are sending email from:

  • a mail server that has been listed

  • a dynamic IP address

  • an open proxy, relay or exploited machine.

 

What to do if an IP address has been blocklisted

 

If the IP address that you are using to send emails has been blocklisted you will recieve a returned email from ourselves.

A typical returned email will look like this.

Nov 28 11:01:07 smtpin-2-12 postfix/smtpd[2975]: NOQUEUE: reject: 

CONNECT from 72-255-38-44.client.stsn.net[72.255.38.44]: 554 DNN4Less is not accepting mail from [ Client host ; 72.255.38.44 ] at this time.
Please contact abuse@
DNN4Less.co.uk quoting this full error message.
cbl.abuseat.org; Blocked - see
http://cbl.abuseat.org/lookup.cgi?ip=72.255.38.44; Reason for listing proto=SMTP

The sections highlighted in this returned message show the IP address sending the email, the company who have listed the IP address, and the reason why the IP address has been listed.

Error messages may differ slightly in layout, however the information contained within them will remain the same.

 

If the message shows Blocked via DNN4Less RBL then the IP address sending the mail has been blocked by DNN4Less' blocklist.

 

Using a dynamic IP address

This is an example bounceback where the sender has attempted to send email from a dynamic IP address.

Diagnostic-Code: SMTP; 554 DNN4Less is not accepting mail from [ Client host ; 112.250.116.241 ] at this time. (dnsbl.sorbs.net; Dynamic IP Addresses See: http://www.sorbs.net/lookup.shtml?112.250.116.241).  Contact abuse@DNN4Less.com if you believe this to be in error.

Due to the increase in trojans and virus's sending spam from infected machines, almost all emails originating from dynamic IP addresses are spam. To protect our customers interests we are not able to accept email directly from a dynamic IP address. If you are using a dynamic IP address please ensure that you are sending email via a designated SMTP server. This server will either by provided by your ISP or by the provider of your email service. If you are using DNN4Less as your Internet service provider, or are sending email from an advanced mailbox you can use DNN4Less SMTP servers to send email.

Using a static IP address

The following example bounceback has been returned as a complaint regarding unsolicited email has been reported as originating from this IP address.

554 DNN4Less is not accepting mail from [ Client host ; 192.168.111.52 ] at this time.  Please contact abuse@DNN4Less.com quoting this full error message.
dnsbl.sorbs.net; Spam Received withing last 12 months See:
http://www.sorbs.net/lookup.shtml? 192.168.111.52 Spam Received Recently See: 
http://www.sorbs.net/lookup.shtml? 192.168.111.52

If you are the administrator of the listed IP address

This email has been returned as a complaint has been made regarding unsolicited, or abusive email originating from this server. Additionally this server may be listed as an open proxy, relay or may be an exploited machine. As the administrator of the IP address listed in this message you should ensure that no unsolicited email is sent from this IP address then contact the company that has you listed. This can be found in the link provided within the returned email. You can then request that they remove your IP address from their records.

If you are sending email through a designated mailserver

Any internet service provider who does not actively take precautions to limit the likelihood of unsolicited email being sent through their servers runs the risk of having the IP addresses involved blocklisted. If your internet service providers mail server has been identified by a blocklist as a source of unwanted or abusive email you should contact them directly. They may require the header of a bounced email to investigate fully.

 

DNN4Less can only act to help fix this problem if you are sending email through a DNN4Less mail server and it is our mail server that has been blocked. If the email that is not being delivered was not sent from a DNN4Less account and through a DNN4Less mail server then we will not be able to act to resolve this issue.

 

All scripts placed in a directory called bin in htdocs will fail to execute. You should either move the files to another folder and remove the folder, or rename the folder.

If emails from a web based script are not arriving it is likely that they are not being sent, or that they are being blocked at the point of origin. There are a number of things you can check however to ensure that your script complies with DNN4Less sending policys.
  • DNN4Less filters all outgoing email. These must have a From or To address that is a domain hosted with DNN4Less. Any email not fulfilling these criteria is stopped.

  • If you are sending email to a customer who has given you their email address, you need to use the domain name of their site (but it does not need to be a valid mailbox, for example noreply@theirdomain.com is a fairly common one to use). If you want the customer to reply to the email you must use a valid account.

  • DNN4Less' SMTP Filter System limits the outgoing mail from a domain to prevent bulk emailing. The limits are set to allow normal form based email activity to pass unhindered, but stop any persistent attempt to send bulk mail.

  • Do not use your site for mass/bulk emailing. The SMTP filter system will prevent this, and all attempts are logged. Attempting to bulk email will lead to your site being closed by our abuse department

If your mailbox password is rejected you may see an error message similar to the following:
There was a problem logging onto your mail server. Your Password was rejected. Account: 'mail.yourdomain.xxx', Server: 'mail.yourdomain.xxx, Protocol: POP3, Server Response: '-ERR invalid user or password', Port: 110, Secure(SSL): No, Server Error: 0x800CCC90, Error Number: 0x800CCC92

First check your mail client (Outlook or Outlook Express) settings, making sure that the POP3 and SMTP servers are correct, as well as user name and password.

 

Testing your connection using the Telnet command

 

Step 1
Click the Start button then RUN type in cmd on (Windows NT/2000/XP) or Command (Windows 95/98/ME). This will open a new command prompt window, with white text on a black screen.

 

Step 2
Type in the following replacing yourdomain.com with your actual domain name. telnet mail.yourdomain.cm 110 then hit the Enter key on your keyboard.

 

You will then be connected to the email server.

 

During this process you may receive a message from your firewall or antivirus software. If this happens you should check your firewall and antivirus configurations as this is likely to be why you are unable to connect.

 

Step 3
Type in USER followed by your email address e.g. USER joe.bloggs@yourdomain.co.uk and then click the Enter key. You will then get a message +OK Helo there. +OK Password required.

 

Step 4
Type in PASS followed by your password e.g. PASS j0eb105 and hit the Enter key. If it is correct, you will get an OK logged in. message.

If you can do this, you have connected to the mail server and the problem lies somewhere with your email client.